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May 9: Internet Red Alert in support of net neutrality

On May 9, Senate Democrats will take the first legislative action in support of net neutrality, officially filing the petition to force a vote on the Senate floor to attempt to preserve strong net neutrality protections passed in 2015. The Senate bill is a Congressional Review Act (CRA) resolution from Sen. Ed Markey (D-MA), which would block the Federal Communications Commission’s (FCC) December repeal of net neutrality rules. Senator Markey has led this effort in the Senate and announced plans via Twitter this week.

The Senate bill now has bipartisan support from 50 of 100 senators and would be assured of passage if just one more Republican backs the effort. From the Senate, the effort would move over to the House of Representatives where it will need 218 votes to pass, and would move on to President Trump for his signature or veto.

Modern libraries rely on the internet to collect, create and disseminate essential online information and services to the public, and ALA is working with allies to encourage Congress to overturn the FCC’s egregious action.

You can join us and others on the internet May 9th for a coordinated “Red Alert” day of action. You can join the Red Alert by using our tool to email your members of Congress and ask them to–or thank them for–supporting a Joint Resolution of Disapproval under the CRA to repeal the December 2017 FCC action and restore the 2015 Open Internet Order protections.

You can also increase visibility for the issue and encourage others to join you via social media.

  • Suggested posts prior to May 9th: “BREAKING: The Senate will officially “discharge” the Congressional Review Act (CRA) petition on May 9th and force a vote to restore #NetNeutrality. Starting then, the Internet goes on #RedAlert.”
  • On and after May 9th: “#RedAlert: Congress has the chance to force a vote to restore #NetNeutrality. Tell (or Thank!) your member of Congress to support the CRA and libraries.

We will continue to update you on the activities above and other developments as we continue to fight to preserve a neutral internet.

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Ellen Satterwhite

Ellen Satterwhite a Washington Office Policy Fellow and Vice President of the Glen Echo Group. She has years of experience at the intersection of technology and policy, including as a co-author of the FCC’s National Broadband Plan and as Consumer Policy Advisor to the Commission. Satterwhite earned a Master’s in Public Affairs from the LBJ School of Public Affairs at the University of Texas at Austin.

6 Comments

  1. Jean Marshall Jean Marshall

    Please vote against the repeal of net neutrality rules. Internet access is a right for all Americans and charging higher prices for some websites over others is not fair.
    Thank you

  2. Barbara Evans Barbara Evans

    As a librarian I see the impact of lack of internet access every day. Please do not make it even more expensive, unequal and therefore difficult for people.

  3. Nicole Zimmermann Nicole Zimmermann

    Looking for the correct URL you mention below. Is this correct? https://cqrcengage.com/ala/app/write-a-letter?0&engagementId=443593

    On and after May 9th: “#RedAlert: Congress has the chance to force a vote to restore #NetNeutrality. Tell (or Thank!) your member of Congress to support the CRA and libraries [add shorturl for action alert].”

  4. That’s correct! And we’ve added the link to the post – thank you!

  5. Andy Salvatore Andy Salvatore

    Net neutrality says that no company that owns communication systems can provide premium services, more rapid service, or more reliable data transmission to any person or company than to any other person or company. It is essentially a socialist regulation that takes control away from the equipment owners and forces the owners to provide the same low quality or slow data rate to everyone. The companies like CenturyLink or Comcast or AT&T must give up the ability to provide high quality service to any customer.
    Basically, the government commandeers the architecture and operation of all network equipment. This is as if the government told all airlines that, “You need to have 2 stops between every flight that is between 100 miles and 1000 miles long. You need to have 3 stops on any airline route that is between 1000 and 2000 miles long. You need to have 4 stops on any airline route that is between 2000 and 3000 miles long. And no flights beyond 3000 miles can be sold. There will be NO person allowed to have a nonstop flight! There will be no first class seating. There will be no seat choices. And each passenger can only transport one 20 lb bag per flight.” It is a source of great inefficiency. It says the government can always plan networks or airline flights better than the owners of the transport equipment (the transceivers, the fiber, the racks, the software, etc). Net neutrality should actually be called (GMEITN) Government Microregulation and Elimination of Innovation for Telecom Networks.

  6. […] Red alert for net neutrality | District Dispatch; “On May 9, Senate Democrats will take the first legislative action in support of net neutrality, officially filing the petition to force a vote on the Senate floor to attempt to preserve strong net neutrality protections passed in 2015. The Senate bill is a Congressional Review Act (CRA) resolution from Sen. Ed Markey (D-MA), which would block the Federal Communications Commission’s (FCC) December repeal of net neutrality rules.” […]

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