Tag Archives: barbara stripling

Vermont State Librarian testifies on the importance of an open internet at Senate hearing

Today, Vermont State Librarian Martha Reid voiced(pdf) the concerns of our nation’s libraries about the importance of an open Internet at a U.S. Senate Committee on the Judiciary field hearing. Led by Senator Patrick Leahy (D-Vt.) in support of network neutrality, the hearing “Preserving an Open Internet: Rules to Promote Competition and Protect Main Street Consumers” took place in Burlington, ... Read More »

Simon & Schuster expands ebook lending program

This morning, Simon & Schuster revealed that it will expand its pilot library ebook lending program to serve all U.S. libraries. Alan Inouye, director of the American Library Association’s Office for Information Technology Policy, wrote about the news on the American Libraries magazine E-content blog: There is good news (pdf) on the ebook front, as Simon & Schuster converts its ... Read More »

ALA welcomes open internet bill

Today, American Library Association (ALA) President Barbara Stripling responded to today’s introduction the Online Competition and Consumer Choice Act of 2014. Introduced by Rep. Doris Matsui (D-CA), the net neutrality bill would prohibit Internet service providers from giving preferential treatment to the traffic of online content, applications, services, or devices. Stripling is rallying librarians to support the legislation: An open ... Read More »

ALA applauds second circuit affirmation of fair use

Today, the U.S. Second Circuit Court of Appeals upheld (pdf) the ruling in Authors Guild v. HathiTrust, deciding that providing a full text search database and providing access to works for people with print disabilities is fair use. The court also ruled that the Authors Guild lacked standing, and therefore could not assert infringement claims against the HathiTrust. The Library ... Read More »

House passes flawed USA FREEDOM Act; summer fight looms in Senate

By a vote of 303 – 121, the House of Representatives today passed a version of the USA FREEDOM Act (H.R. 3361) intended to end the “dragnet”-style collection of Americans’ phone records by the government, but which even many of its principal authors and sponsors acknowledged did not go far enough to protect citizens’ privacy. As a result, the American ... Read More »