ALA launches educational 3D printing policy campaign

Progress in the Making ReporttThe American Library Association (ALA) today announced the launch of “Progress in the Making,” (pdf) a new educational campaign that will explore the public policy opportunities and challenges of 3D printer adoption by libraries. Today, the association released “Progress in the Making: An Introduction to 3D Printing and Public Policy,” a tip sheet that provides an overview of 3D printing, describes a number of ways libraries are currently using 3D printers, outlines the legal implications of providing the technology, and details ways that libraries can implement simple yet protective 3D printing policies in their own libraries.

“As the percentage of the nation’s libraries helping their patrons create new objects and structures with 3D printers continues to increase, the legal implications for offering the high-tech service in the copyright, patent, design and trade realms continues to grow as well,” said Alan S. Inouye, director of the ALA Office for Information Technology Policy. “We have reached a point in the evolution of 3D printing services where libraries need to consider developing user policies that support the library mission to make information available to the public. If the library community promotes practices that are smart and encourage creativity, it has a real chance to guide the direction of the public policy that takes shape around 3D printing in the coming years.”

Over the next coming months, ALA will release a white paper and a series of tip sheets that will help the library community better understand and adapt to the growth of 3D printers, specifically as the new technology relates to intellectual property law and individual liberties.

This tip sheet is the product of collaboration between the Public Library Association (PLA), the ALA Office for Information Technology Policy (OITP) and United for Libraries, and coordinated by OITP Information Policy Analyst Charlie Wapner. View the tip sheet (pdf).

Posted in OITP Tagged with: , , , ,

CopyTalk webinar on open licensing

Join us for our next installment of CopyTalk, October 2nd at 2pm Eastern Time. It’s FREE.

In the webinar titled Open Licensing and the Public Domain: Tools and policies to support libraries, scholars, and the public, Timothy will discuss the Creative Commons (CC) licenses and public domain instruments, with a particular focus on how these tools are being used within the GLAM (galleries, libraries, archives and museums) sector. He’ll also talk about the evolving Open Access movement–including legal and technological challenges to researchers and publishers–and how librarians and copyright experts are helping address these issues. Finally, he’ll discuss the increasing role of institutional policies and funding mandates that are being adopted to support the creation and sharing of content and data in the public commons.

Timothy Vollmer is Public Policy Manager for Creative Commons. He coordinates public policy positions in collaboration with CC staff, international affiliate network, and a broad community of copyright experts. Timothy helps educate policymakers at all levels and across various disciplines such as education, data, science, culture, and government about copyright licensing, the public domain, and the adoption of open policies. Prior to CC, Timothy worked on information policy issues for the American Library Association in Washington, D.C. He is a graduate of the University of Michigan, School of Information, and helped establish the Open.Michigan initiative.

There is no need to pre-register! Just show up on October 2, at 2pm Eastern http://ala.adobeconnect.com/r8ermgzwgts/

 

 

Posted in Copyright Tagged with: ,

Webinar: Fighting Ebola with information

Photo by Phil Moyer

Photo by Phil Moyer

Recent outbreaks across the globe and in the U.S. have increased public awareness of the potential public health impacts of infectious diseases. As a result, many librarians are assisting their patrons in finding credible information sources on topics such as Ebola, Chikungunya and pandemic influenza.

The American Library Association (ALA) is encouraging librarians to participate in “Fighting Ebola and Infectious Diseases with Information: Resources and Search Skills Can Arm Librarians,” a free webinar that will teach participants how to find and share reliable health information. Librarians from the U.S. National Library of Medicine will host the interactive webinar, which takes place on Tuesday, October 14, 2014, from 2–3:00p.m. Eastern.

Speakers include:

Siobhan Champ-Blackwell
Siobhan Champ-Blackwell is a librarian with the U.S. National Library of Medicine Disaster Information Management Research Center. She selects material to be added to the NLM disaster medicine grey literature data base and is responsible for the Center’s social media efforts. She has over 10 years of experience in providing training on NLM products and resources.

Elizabeth Norton
Elizabeth Norton is a librarian with the U.S. National Library of Medicine Disaster Information Management Research Center where she has been working to improve online access to disaster health information for the disaster medicine and public health workforce. She has presented on this topic at national and international association meetings and has provided training on disaster health information resources to first responders, educators, and librarians working with the disaster response and public health preparedness communities.

Date: Tuesday, October 14, 2014
Time: 2:00 PM – 3:00 PM Eastern
Register for the free event

If you cannot attend this live session, a recorded archive will be available to view at your convenience. To view past webinars also hosted collaboratively with iPAC, please visit Lib2Gov.org.

Posted in Events, Government Information, OGR, Public Libraries Tagged with: , ,

Celebrating the National Student Poets Program

White House PhotoLast week, I had the pleasure of attending a dinner to honor the National Student Poets. Each year, the National Student Poets Program recognizes five extraordinary high school students, who receive college scholarships and opportunities to present their work at writing and poetry events across the country—which includes events at libraries.

To qualify for the National Student Poets Program, one must demonstrate excellence in poetry, provide evidence that they received prior awards for their work, and successfully navigate a multi-level selection process. The program is sponsored and hosted by the President’s Committee on the Arts and Humanities, the Institute of Museum and Library Services, Scholastic Art & Writing Awards, and several other groups, with the dinner hosted at the fabulous, new Google Washington Office—altogether an interesting collaboration.

The students began the day at the White House, and they read their poetry in the Blue Room, hosted by the First Lady. Then they met with a group of White House speechwriters to talk about the creation of a different kind of “poetry.” At the dinner, I sat next to one of the incoming (2014) National Student Poets, Cameron Messinides, a 17-year old from Greenville, South Carolina. He, as well as the other honorees, exhibited impressive, almost intimidating ability and poise in their presentations and informal conversation.

The advent of the digital age does not, of course, negate important forms of intellectual endeavor such as poetry, but does raise questions about how these forms of traditional communication extend online. And for the American Library Association (ALA), there are further questions about how libraries may best participate in this extension. Then there is the question of how to convey such library possibilities to decision makers and influencers. Thus, under the rubric of our Policy Revolution! Initiative as well as a new Office for Information Technology Policy program, we are exploring the needs and opportunities of children and youth with respect to technology and libraries with this eye on engaging national decision makers and influencers.

Well, OK, the event was fun too. With all due deference to our Empress of E-rate (Marijke Visser, who is the associate director of the ALA Office for Information Technology Policy), one cannot spend all of one’s time on E-rate and such matters, though even so, admittedly one can see a plausible link between E-rate, libraries, and poetry. So even at this dinner, E-rate did lurk in the back of my mind… I guess there is no true escape from E-rate.

Score one for the Empress.

Posted in Events, OITP Tagged with: , , , , ,

Copyright Office under the congressional spotlight

Last Thursday, the U.S. House Judiciary Subcommittee on Courts, Intellectual Property, and the Internet held a hearing to gather information about the work of the U.S. Copyright Office and to learn about the challenges the Office faces in trying to fulfill its many responsibilities. Testifying before the Committee was Maria Pallante, Register of Copyrights and Director of the Copyright Office (view Pallante’s testimony (pdf)). Pallante gave a thorough overview of the Office’s administrative, public policy and regulatory functions, and highlighted a number of ways in which the Office’s structure and position within the federal bureaucracy create inefficiencies in its day-to-day operations. Pallante described these inefficiencies as symptoms of a larger problem: The 1976 Copyright Act vested the Office with the resources and authority it needed to thrive in an analog world, but it failed to anticipate the new needs the Office would develop in adjusting to a digital world.

Broadcast live streaming video on Ustream

Although the Office’s registration system—the system by which it registers copyright claims—was brought online in 2008, Pallante describes it as nothing more than a 20th century system presented in a 21st century format. The Office’s recordation system—the process by which it records copyright documents—is still completed manually and has not been updated for decades. Pallante considers fully digitizing the registration and recordation functions of the Copyright Office a top priority:

From an operational standpoint, the Office’s electronic registration system was fully implemented in 2008 by adapting off-the-shelf software. It was designed to transpose the paper-based system of the 20th century into an electronic interface, and it accomplished that goal. However, as technology continues to move ahead we must continue to evaluate and implement improvements. Both the registration and recordation systems need to be increasingly flexible to meet the rapidly changing needs of a digital marketplace.

Despite Pallante’s commitment to updating these systems, she cited her lack of administrative autonomy within the Library of Congress and her Office’s tightening budget as significant impediments to achieving this goal. Several members of the Committee suggested that the Office would have greater latitude to update its operations for the digital age if it were moved out from under the authority of the Library of Congress (LOC). While Pallante did not explicitly support this idea, she was receptive to suggestions from members of the Subcommittee that her office carries out very specialized functions that differ from those that are carried out by the rest of the LOC. Overall, Pallante seemed open to—if not supportive of—having a longer policy discussion on the proper position of the Copyright Office within the federal government.

In addition to providing insight into the inner-workings of the copyright office, the hearing continued the policy discussion on the statutory and regulatory frameworks that govern the process of documenting a copyright. As the Judiciary Committee continues to review the copyright law, it will be interesting to see if it further examines statutory and regulatory changes to the authority and structure of the Copyright Office.

Posted in Copyright, Government Information, OITP Tagged with: , ,

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