Legislation

Last week in appropriations

Clock hands pointing to the words "time for reveiw"

The Appropriations process in Congress is a year-long cycle with fits and starts, and includes plenty of lobbying, grassroots appeals, lobby days, speeches, hearings and markups, and even creative promotions designed to draw attention to the importance of one program or another. ALA members and the Office of Government Relations continue to play a significant role in this process. Recently, ... Read More »

Judiciary Committee Senators face historic “E-Privacy” protection vote

Laptop chained up

More good news could be in the offing for reform of ECPA, the Electronic Communications Privacy Act. Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Charles Grassley (R-IA) recently (and pleasantly) surprised reform proponents by calendaring a Committee vote on the issue now likely to take place this coming Thursday morning, May 26th.  The Committee, it is hoped, will take up and pass H.R. ... Read More »

Senate committee approves legislative branch funding without fireworks

Japanese macaque yawning

In stark contrast to Tuesday’s full House Appropriations Committee markup – which, as previously reported, featured almost 30 minutes of hot debate over legislative report language intended to bar the Library of Congress (LC) from retiring the subject headings “Aliens” and “Illegal aliens” — the Senate Appropriations Committee took scarcely 3 minutes on Thursday to call up, “debate” and pass ... Read More »

House appropriators narrowly vote to politicize LC subject heading choices

Library of Congress Subject Headings

The full House Appropriations Committee met earlier today to “mark up” (amend and vote on) legislation to fund the Legislative Branch for FY 2017. As previously reported and expected, language inserted in the official Report accompanying the bill at the Subcommittee level essentially instructing the Library not to implement proposed changes to the subject headings “aliens” and “illegal aliens” was ... Read More »

The strange case of Congress and the confounding (re)classifications

Mad hatter's tea party

You wouldn’t think that a decision by the Library of Congress about what subject headings libraries generally should use in, for example, an online catalog would create a political flap. Then again, in Washington – like the world on the other side of Alice’s looking glass – the usual rules of, well, almost anything tend not to apply. Here’s the ... Read More »