Restrictions thwart 3D printing exemption

Library of Congress' rules for unlocking 3D printers thwart the exemption. Courtesy of Amanda Slater, Flickr.

Copyright Office to makers: Break unfair 3D printing DRM – but not really. Since late last year, the American Library Association has been tracking and participating in the latest round of the 1201 Rulemaking. Through this rulemaking process, the Copyright Office evaluates petitions for hacking barriers to digital content (formally known as Digital Rights Management) for lawful purposes. (ALA recently welcomed ... Read More »

CopyTalk: Creativity, fan fiction, and fair use

Cup of coffee with beans.

Join this free webinar November 5 @ 2PM EDT Fan-created works in general are broadly available to people at the click of a link. Fan fiction hasn’t been the subject of any litigation, but it plays an increasing role in literacy as its creation and consumption has skyrocketed. Practice on the ground can matter as much as cases in the courts, ... Read More »

The 1201 giant rests, momentarily

Photo Credit: Lucarelli

This week, the U.S. Copyright Office issued exemptions to the 1201 rulemaking, something that I have whined about before, but this time around, there is a growing number of the disenchanted—from all walks of life, including farmers, video game enthusiasts, vidders, and software security engineers and researchers. The Internet of Things has made circumvention of technological protection measures (aka DRM) ... Read More »

In Google case, court finds creating an index is fair use

Copyright Card Catalog Files.

This is how I always describe Google Book Search (GBS) – it’s an index, and in this case, a truly magnificent one. Today we learned that the Second Circuit Court of Appeals upheld the district court’s summary judgment that the GBS is a transformative fair use, so it’s happy days for people in library land. Many will know that this ... Read More »

Libraries comment on licensing proposal

The Library Copyright Alliance (LCA), of which ALA is a member, filed comments on the U.S. Copyright Office’s proposal for a five-year pilot to test the efficacy of an extended collective licensing (ECL) model for the non-profit, educational use of protected works in mass digitization collections. The U.S. Copyright Office contemplates that full text access of digitized content eventually will ... Read More »