Copyright

ALA Washington Office copyright event “too good to be true”

ALAEventPhoto

On Tuesday, November 18th, the American Library Association (ALA) held a panel discussion on recent judicial interpretations of the doctrine of fair use. The discussion, entitled “Too Good to be True: Are the Courts Revolutionizing Fair Use for Education, Research and Libraries?” is the first in a series of information policy discussions to help us chart the way forward as ... Read More »

ALA to host copyright policy discussion in Washington, D.C.

madison-building-front

#174601328 / gettyimages.com The way we access and use information in the digital age is fundamentally mediated by copyright policy. For several decades, this policy has been largely shaped by commercial interests. However, in the last three years, several court decisions have been more protective of public access to information and accommodating to the needs of the education, research, and ... Read More »

Libraries again fight for exemptions from “Digital Locks” copyright law

Space Nebula

For astronomers, it might be once in a few million years when a key comet comes back around.  For a soccer-crazed world, it’s every four years until the World Cup is back in play.  For library-focused copyright “geeks” the not-really-magic-at-all interval is 3 years.  That’s how often librarians, educators, disabled persons, internet security researchers, technologists, businesses and anyone else who ... Read More »

I’m right! Librarians have to think

I will pat myself on the back (somebody has to). I wrote in the 2004 edition of Copyright Copyright, “Fair use cannot be reduced to a checklist. Fair use requires that people think.” This point has been affirmed (pdf) by the Eleventh Circuit Court of Appeals in the long standing Georgia State University (GSU) e-reserves copyright case. The appeals court ... Read More »