Congress clears bill that protects libraries from enforcement of Consumer Product Safety Improvement Act

After three years, the Consumer Product Safety Improvement Act (CPSIA) issue has been resolved! On August 1, U.S. Rep. Mary Bono Mack (R-CA) introduced H.R. 2715, a bill to provide the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) with greater authority and discretion in enforcing the consumer product safety laws, and for other purposes.  This bill provides the further guidance that the CPSC stated was required in order to enforce the CPSIA as Congress had originally intended.  This bill protects libraries in two ways:

1. Page 2 of the bill specifies that “each limit set forth … shall apply only to a children’s product … that is manufactured after the effective date of such respective limit.”  This would then require the manufacturers of books to ensure that their processes are safe and fall within the limits of the law.

2. Pages 18-19 of the bill states that “the third party testing requirements established … shall not apply to ordinary books or ordinary paper-based printed materials” and then continues to define both ordinary book and ordinary paper-based printed materials.

In a whirlwind of events, the bill passed the House (421-2) and then went to the Senate where it was passed without amendment by unanimous consent.

For information on why librarians have been concerned about this act, please visit the ALA website.

About Jenni Terry

One comment

  1. Congratulations, ALA Washington Office, on a job well done. I had previously congratulated you at “ALA Uses Common Sense on CPSIA Child Safety Issue; Congratulations to Emily Sheketoff and the ALA Washington Office,” 11 January 2009.

    I did modify my enthusiasm somewhat in “The ALA was FOR CPSIA Before They Were Against It,” 15 March 2009.

    Nevertheless, well done.

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