What is the Future of Libraries?

On Saturday, June 28, at ALA’s Annual Conference in Anaheim, CA, some of the library profession’s most forward-thinking minds will tackle the question, “What is the future of libraries?” Details below!

What is the Future of Libraries?
Sponsored by ALA’s Office for Information Technology Policy (OITP)
Saturday, June 28, 10:30 a.m. to 12:00 p.m., Anaheim Convention Center 207-D

Come to our Saturday session to find out! A distinguished panel moderated by Roger Levien (OITP Fellow) comprising:

  • Joan Frye Williams (President, Joan Frye Williams Consulting),
  • Stephen Abram (Vice President of Innovation, SirsiDynix), and
  • José-Marie Griffiths (Dean and Professor, U of North Carolina, Chapel Hill)

will share their perspectives. The panel will consider questions such as:

  1. What might libraries look like in 10, 20, or 30 years?
  2. Which trends in information technology or society are most important or most interesting for the future of libraries, and why?
  3. Given the evolution in information technology and online services, what are the most promising opportunities for libraries in the coming decade?
  4. What do the workforce trends today imply about the library services that are delivered tomorrow? And what can be done today to better prepare us for delivering relevant services for the library of the future?

Also at this session, David Lankes (Associate Professor, Syracuse University and OITP Fellow) will talk about recent developments in “Participatory Librarianship,” an important new direction for the field. Vivian Pisano (Chief of Information Technology, San Francisco Public Library) and Alan Inouye (OITP Director) will introduce a new Program on America’s Libraries in the 21st Century that will formalize the future of libraries as an activity of ALA.

About Jacob Roberts

Jacob Roberts is the communications specialist for the ALA Washington Office.

One comment

  1. Commenting on: What is the Future of Libraries?

    If the purpose of a library is to preserve the past via the literature, texts, thoughts and steps of mankind, which I think it is. A comprehensive plan will be created and undertaken to digitize all existing manuscripts and information – visual and auditory included.

    And I mean all. Without bias or any form of selection virtually every word, picture – static or animated – movie, book, song, speech, show, play, television broadcast, newspaper, private notes submitted and collected ….. eventually will be put into a digital format. Thus the creation of the greatest database ever conceived will occur.

    It will be the labor of the library system to collate, reference and continue the compilation of this digital system for its use by humanity.

    The challenge will be to never thwart the access to this database via any form of prejudice, political, religious or other exclusive process.

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